miscfisc

Robert MacPherson (Australia 1937 - )
Mayfair: Summer farm, forty five signs for Micky Monsour, synthetic polymer paint on masonite, 45 panels, 280 x 957cm overall installed, 1993.

Robert MacPherson (Australia 1937 - )

Mayfair: Summer farm, forty five signs for Micky Monsour, synthetic polymer paint on masonite, 45 panels, 280 x 957cm overall installed, 1993.

— 22 hours ago
#Robert MacPherson 
"Metaphysical silence happens inside words themselves. And its intentions are harder to define."
— 1 day ago with 29 notes
#Anne Carson  #Variations on the Right to Remain Silent 
"The painter Willem de Kooning famously called himself a slipping glimpser, slipping into the glimpse—slipping toward the image—that he would then arrest in paint. I spend much of my time trying to write poems about what I can single out from my own slipping, which is difficult because when you’re slipping you tend to keep your eyes trained on your feet to keep from crashing; it’s hard to lift your eyes so that the world can be attended to. Easy to forget, the world is still occurring outside the drama of the self, and the poem of the self is going to be limited unless the world can enter in."
Lucia Perillo, from “The Glimpse,” in I’ve Heard the Vultures Singing: Field Notes on Poetry, Illness, and Nature (Trinity University Press, 2007)

(Source: apoetreflects)

— 1 day ago with 70 notes
#Lucia Perillo  #Willem de Kooning  #slipping glimpsers 

Judith Wright (Australia 1945 - )

A Continuing Fable [2], acrylic on japanese paper, 100 x 100cm 2008
Desire [16], acrylic and wax on japanese paper, 300 x 300cm, 2009
Silent Memories II, colour aquatint, 80 x 60cm, 1994

— 2 days ago
#Judith Wright 
Arcangelo Ianelli (Brazil 1922 - 2009)
Untitled, oil on canvas, 99 x 80cm, 1981

Arcangelo Ianelli (Brazil 1922 - 2009)

Untitled, oil on canvas, 99 x 80cm, 1981

(Source: blastedheath)

— 2 days ago with 93 notes
#Arcangelo Ianelli 
"The unreal is more powerful than the real. Because nothing is as perfect as you can imagine it. Because it’s only intangible ideas, concepts, beliefs, fantasies that last. Stone crumbles. Wood rots. People, well, they die. But things as fragile as a thought, a dream, a legend, they can go on and on. If you can change the way people think, the way they see themselves, the way they see the world—you can change the way people live their lives. That’s the only lasting thing you can create."
Chuck Palahniuk, from Choke

(Source: hellanne, via apoetreflects)

— 2 days ago with 5079 notes
#Chuck Palahniuk  #Choke  #entropic  #antientropic 
"Before reaching the final line, however, he had already understood that he would never leave that room, for it was foreseen that the city of mirrors (or mirages) would be wiped out by the wind and exiled from the memory of men at the precise moment when Aureliano Babilonia would finish deciphering the parchments, and that everything written on them was unrepeatable since time immemorial and forever more, because races condemned to one hundred years of solitude did not have a second opportunity on earth."
Gabriel García Márquez, from One Hundred Years of Solitude (via the-final-sentence)
— 2 days ago with 68 notes
#Gabriel Garcia Márquez  #One Hundred Years of Solitude  #tfs 
"… And that wherever they might be they always remember that the past was a lie, that memory has no return, that every spring gone by could never be recovered, and that the wildest and most tenacious love was an ephemeral truth in the end."
Gabriel García Márquez, from One Hundred Years of Solitude 

(Source: themoonisgreen, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

— 3 days ago with 908 notes
#Gabriel Garcia Márquez  #One Hundred Years of Solitude 
theparisreview:


Circulation folder and slip stamped DISCARDED, after one measly entry on May 5, 1969. Found in a ridiculously well-preserved copy of Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, Third Series. Introduced by Alfred Kazin, published in 1967 by The Paris Review—includes interviews with Jean Cocteau, Evelyn Waugh, Saul Bellow, Arthur Miller, Norman Mailer, Allen Ginsberg, etc.

A great find by sashawantsmore.

theparisreview:

Circulation folder and slip stamped DISCARDED, after one measly entry on May 5, 1969. Found in a ridiculously well-preserved copy of Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, Third Series. Introduced by Alfred Kazin, published in 1967 by The Paris Review—includes interviews with Jean Cocteau, Evelyn Waugh, Saul Bellow, Arthur Miller, Norman Mailer, Allen Ginsberg, etc.

A great find by sashawantsmore.

— 4 days ago with 270 notes
"The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation.

For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And along the way, lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you."
Neil deGrasse Tyson, during his Reddit AMA (March 01, 2012)

(Source: crookedindifference)

— 4 days ago with 9947 notes
#Neil deGrasse Tyson 

theparisreview:

“Jump off the cliff and build your wings on the way down.” The secret of life and love, according to Ray Bradbury. (via)

— 4 days ago with 1026 notes
#Ray Bradbury  #life and love  #owning and doing  #nowness 
"And then often it is only half things I remember, half things, beginnings of things."
Harold Pinter, Silence (via robcam-wfu)

(via symmetryeal)

— 4 days ago with 138 notes
#Harold Pinter  #Silence  #half things  #beginnings of things 

archivesofamericanart:

PAUL CUMMINGS: Where is the accent in your name?

SOL LeWITT: It’s the last syllable - LeWITT. [Emphasis on “Witt”]

MR. CUMMINGS: It is? People argue about that all the time.

MR. LeWITT: It’s not a very interesting argument

- Oral history interview with Sol LeWitt, 1974 July 15. 

(Source: aaa.si.edu)

— 4 days ago with 53 notes
#Sol LeWitt