miscfisc

chizukurowassan:
"I’m 87 years old…I only eat so I can smoke and stay alive.. The only fear I have is how long consciousness is gonna hang on after my body goes. I just hope there’s nothing. Like there was before I was born. I’m not really into religion, they’re all macrocosms of the ego. When man began to think he was a separate person with a separate soul, it created a violent situation.
The void, the concept of nothingness, is terrifying to most people on the planet. And I get anxiety attacks myself. I know the fear of that void. You have to learn to die before you die. You give up, surrender to the void, to nothingness.
Anybody else you’ve interviewed bring these things up? Hang on, I gotta take this call….. Hey, brother. That’s great, man. Yeah, I’m being interviewed… We’re talking about nothing. I’ve got him well-steeped in nothing right now. He’s stopped asking questions.”
- HARRY DEAN STANTON
(x)

chizukurowassan:

"I’m 87 years old…I only eat so I can smoke and stay alive.. The only fear I have is how long consciousness is gonna hang on after my body goes. I just hope there’s nothing. Like there was before I was born. I’m not really into religion, they’re all macrocosms of the ego. When man began to think he was a separate person with a separate soul, it created a violent situation.

The void, the concept of nothingness, is terrifying to most people on the planet. And I get anxiety attacks myself. I know the fear of that void. You have to learn to die before you die. You give up, surrender to the void, to nothingness.

Anybody else you’ve interviewed bring these things up? Hang on, I gotta take this call….. Hey, brother. That’s great, man. Yeah, I’m being interviewed… We’re talking about nothing. I’ve got him well-steeped in nothing right now. He’s stopped asking questions.”

- HARRY DEAN STANTON

(x)

(Source: ciaobelatarr, via jawhitaker)

rudygodinez:

Michal Rovner, Five Photographs from the Outside Series (1991)

(via)

(via jawhitaker)

I found a white piece of paper
with your name on it
your old phone number written in the dark
loop of your handwriting.
I was standing outside a restaurant
watching this one cloud
float by like foam on a pint of beer
and thinking about how good
you’ve become at not being here anymore, how you
finally broke
like a storm across the sky of everything.

—Matthew Dickmanopening lines to “Cloud” from The American Poetry Review (v.41 no. 4, July/August 2012) (via apoetreflects)

(via contramonte)

heteroglossia:

Cy Twombly

heteroglossia:

Cy Twombly

(Source: uvre)

"The true magic of this broken world lay in the ability of the things it contained to vanish, to become so thoroughly lost, that they might never have existed in the first place."

— Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

Brock Davis, torn paper held up over pine tree (via mythologyofblue)

Brock Davis, torn paper held up over pine tree (via mythologyofblue)

"I discovered The Silent Woman, Janet Malcolm’s portrait of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, last fall and read it in just one sitting, the book in one hand and a champagne flute of white wine in the other. I had recently broken all of my wine glasses. I did not break them all at the same time. Some I broke while cleaning, and I was upset that I had managed to destroy something while trying to make it clean, make it better. Other glasses were broken using more theatrical methods, smashing them against walls to prove points. I had also recently broken my bed frame, cracked a rib, and wrecked a series of valuable relationships. Broken things had become my metric. It was fall and this book fell on my head in the Strand. It was fall and everything was falling out of place. It was fall and I felt, constantly, as if I were in a state of vertigo. I could go on. I won’t."

The Last Book I Loved: The Silent Woman by Michelle King. (via therumpus)

(via therumpus)

Lee Krasner, Milkweed, 1955 (via yama-bato)
Lee Krasner, Milkweed, 1955 (via yama-bato)

(via soundgrammar)

We come to silence by Linda Pastan

We come to silence slowly
Washed into the world
on a wave of sound
we leave it later with closed mouths,
our tongues grown heavy
as stones to anchor us
in earth. Now we hear
wind in the noisy leaves,
a hubbub of water
over the rocks,
the musical warfare
of the birds.
Consider the ear
shaped like the bass clef
but empty.
Consider the spaces between stars
soliloquies of light.
It is almost time
to hush the children,
to quiet the dogs.
Even your words grow muffled
in my hair, soon
it will be only touch
I know you by.
These are the corridors
of silence, enter
on tiptoe.
Here Orpheus sleeps,
his harp unstrung.
Here the sound
a leaf makes
falling to ground
may deafen us.

Ben Nicholson (1894–1982), July 62 (cool moon), 1962, oil paint and graphite on board, 254 x 352 mm (via treebystream)

Ben Nicholson (1894–1982), July 62 (cool moon), 1962, oil paint and graphite on board, 254 x 352 mm (via treebystream)

(via almoadhadi)

"I know this much: that there is objective time, but also subjective time, the kind you wear on the inside of your wrist, next to where the pulse lies. And this personal time, which is the true time, is measured in your relationship to memory."

— Julian Barnes, from The Sense of an Ending

(Source: memoryslandscape)

transistoradio:

John Hoyland (1934–2011), Backyards, Sheffield (c.1958), oil on canvas, 71.5 x 92 cm. Via BBC.

transistoradio:

John Hoyland (1934–2011), Backyards, Sheffield (c.1958), oil on canvas, 71.5 x 92 cm. Via BBC.

(via soundgrammar)

"Lift up your dark heart and sing a song about
how time drifts past you like the gentlest, almost
imperceptible breeze."

— Jim Harrison, from “Cold Poem,” in Saving Daylight (Copper Canyon Press, 2012)

(Source: litverve, via contramonte)

Barbara Bloom, Girls Footprints, 2007
Barbara Bloom, Girls Footprints, 2007

(Source: vvolare, via stargazinginwonderland)

"What I’ve always liked about Proust is his unabashed shallowness – or, more precisely, his celebration of the power and primacy of fleeting impressions in decision-making."

Proust: A Shallow Fellow by Sandra Hajda (via therumpus)

(via therumpus)